Treasury of manuscripts

A Treasure Trove of Manuscripts with Untold Secrets

by / 0 Comments / 48 View / December 30, 2012

Old manuscripts and documents are like hidden treasure to any graphologist.  Not only do they have historical value but they also reveal untold secrets about the writers’ personalities.

There are many archives and university libraries that literally have treasure troves of fascinating information in their manuscripts and documents. And just think about it –  each one has a personal story to tell.

The following interesting excerpt comes from a newsletter at Conway’s Vintage Treasures. It is one that I particularly liked because it resonated with me graphology-wise.  It highlights how even though texting has its place – a handwritten letter will always carry a deeper meaning. Here it is:

“Stories still have the power and impact that they always did, it’s just more difficult to get people to “stop” long enough to listen (as they self indulge in meaningless texting and social media  dialogue). 

That’s what makes extraordinary collecting so valuable.  Hold up an original poster from the 1931 classic “Frankenstein” and watch people stop to listen. 

Or introduce them to a handwritten letter from Abraham Lincoln or Elvis Presley or a photo signed by Babe Ruth and all of a sudden all the electronic distractions are put aside and an “old fashion” intriguing conversation takes place. 

They want to hear the “story” of how and when.”

It’s impossible not to agree because –

Every handwriting tells a story

Just like these old illuminated manuscripts, every old handwriting sample has a story to tell – and that is the fascinating part. A handwritten manuscript is so much more than  just a picture.  Because as Graphologists, we don’t just look at the handwriting – we can delve much deeper into the psyche of the personality.

There is so much to discover in these manuscripts. There are documents of every variety ranging from letters by kings and queens to love letters of famous writers. 

You can find out personality details about famous scientists like Darwin. I was so fascinated by his handwriting that I delved into his life story and then branched into an armchair exploration of the Galapagos Islands.

And then take a look at Elvis Presley’s letter to Nixon. It’s a huge story and it’s all there in his letter with layer upon layer of fascinating information that you can unpeel like an  onion.

And that is exactly what I  mean about a treasure trove of information – graphology encourages you to explore all kinds of interesting avenues.

I think you will agree with me that an excursion into the treasure troves of Graphology can be the most exciting and fascinating of finds.

What do you think?

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