Handwriting or texting

The Battle between Handwriting and Texting

by / 4 Comments / 311 View / March 10, 2016

Will Handwriting Survive the 21st Century?

I don’t know if handwriting will go the way of dodo eggs but it’s certainly losing popularity to typing and texting.

I was stunned the other day to witness an informal texting competition (the thumbs only variety) where young children texted so fast that I began to feel quite stupid.

My own texting is still of the slow and painful variety and I freely admit that texting with panache is a talent that I envy.

It’s a marvelous talent that children today seem to be born with.

Meanwhile what has happened to handwriting? Is it in danger?

Will it go the way of Cuneiform and hieroglyphics?

During the 19th Century and the beginning of the 20th century people tended to write carefully, formally and even beautifully.

There was a certain artistry about handwriting and having a “good hand.” Handwriting looked civilized!

And then came Informality

•    Art no longer attempted to reproduce reality and became abstract.
•    Music lost its melody and turned to rhythm and beat.
•    Fashion and manners loosened up to reflect the new influences.

Handwriting was sent to the proverbial wall.  And it could no longer remain unscathed.

The Effect of Informality on Handwriting

As informality spilled over into various areas of people’s lives it began to influence handwriting too.  Handwriting was no longer as schooled as before and individuality in handwriting became a little more acceptable.

Of course informality is a two edged sword. In one way, informality leads to self-expression and greater creativity.

On the other hand, if taken too far it can lead to a lack of discipline.

The Demise of Cursive Handwriting?

Today, in the spirit of informality and pragmatism, many schools are considering dropping cursive handwriting altogether.  Many have done so already.

So my question is: do you think handwriting will survive the 21st Century?  Or will handwriting eventually suffer the same fate as cuneiform and hieroglyphics?

And-

  • If cursive handwriting is dropped entirely, will printing eventually go the same way?
  • Is there still a point to cursive writing?
  • Do you think we should try to keep cursive handwriting alive or let it die a slow but natural death?

I know what Graphologists think about it.

But here is something for you to watch.  This wonderful TED talk explains the beauty and power of the pen – and the importance of handwriting.

Take a few minutes to watch it. You will be enthralled and enriched by it.

Why write? Penmanship and the 21st Century

 

 

What do you think?

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