Leonardo Da Vinci – an Inventor and a Genius

by / 3 Comments / 704 View / December 26, 2010

Before we take a look at Da Vinci’s handwriting let’s first get an idea of the scope of his genius and inventiveness.

Because once we understand how multi-talented he was, we will be better able to appreciate the complexity of his handwriting

So don’t skip this brief biography. It’s important because it gives us an inkling of his diversity.

Leonardo Da Vinci, a painter of the Italian Renaissance, was born in the Italian village of Vinci – hence the surname.

Today he is mostly famous for his paintings of the Mona Lisa and The Last Supper but he was also an accomplished sculptor and inventor.

 

An Inventor and a Genius

Da Vinci Helicopter

Da Vinci Helicopter

 

Da Vinci excelled in so many fields and was so multi-talented that he is widely regarded as one of the greatest geniuses that ever lived.

He studied anatomy, astronomy botany and geology and his notebooks are filled with diagrams and drawings that show the most amazing details of the inventions that he designed.

His anatomical drawings are considered to be the first accurate drawings of the human body.

As an inventor, he was far ahead of his time. He designed artillery and made plans to divert rivers. He designed movable bridges and even a moving robot.

But there was much more. The scope and versatility of his mind seem limitless.

In his famous notebooks there are even plans for a flying machine, a helicopter and a parachute.

Incidentally Da Vinci’s design for a parachute was recently proved to be workable.

 

Da Vinci’s Parachute

A daring skydiver, Adrian Nicholas, tested out a parachute that was built according to Da Vinci’s plans using only material that was available 500 years ago.

Taking his wood and canvas parachute up in a hot air balloon he set sail from about 10,000 feet above the ground.

 

Da Vinci Parachute

Da Vinci’s Parachute

 

After it landed safely to huge acclaim his triumphant comment was:

“It took one of the greatest minds who ever lived to design it, but it took 500 years to find a man with a brain small enough to actually go and fly it.

“All the experts agreed it wouldn’t work – it would tip over or fall apart or spin around and make you sick – but Leonardo was right all along. It’s just that no one else has ever bothered trying to build it before.

“The whole experience was incredibly moving, like one of those great English boy’s own adventures. I had a feeling of gentle elation and celebration. It was like floating under a balloon.

“I was able to stare out at the river below, with the wind rattling through my ears. As I landed, I thanked Leonardo for a wonderful ride.”

So with that as a background to help our understanding we will take a look at Da Vinci’s handwriting in the following post.


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